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How to Make Lilac Jelly

How to Make Lilac Jelly

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I know it sounds like something extremely unique and it actually is. There are a ton of flowers that are edible and Lilacs just happens to be one of them.

Want to make sure you get your lilacs from a source that does not use chemicals on them and certainly nothing by a roadside that has accumulated the nasty car exhaust, etc. I “borrowed” from my neighbor this year, in exchange for a jar of the final product.

For each batch You will need:

  • 2 1/4 cups lilac water
  • 4 cups Sugar
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice (one half a large lemon pressed)
  • one box of Pectin

I picked enough lilac blossoms to fill my 2 quart pitcher and then covered it with water. You need to let it set 24 hours.

Strain the liquid off the blossoms and discard the blossoms.

You can see how much “juice” I had after removing the lilac blossoms.

See that nice, dark color?

Now you have to measure 2 1/2 cups of the juice and pop into your pan. Add lemon juice, pectin and, if you hate skimming off foam, 1/2 TBSP butter. Bring it to a boil and stir in the sugar. Bring it to a full boil again for a full minute then remove from heat.

Start ladling into your prepared jelly jars. Add clean lids and your rings. You will want to water bath it for 10 minutes and then you are good to go! Remove from the hot water and let cool (I like to leave them on a kitchen towel overnight.)

lil

This is a light jelly with a slight floral scent. We prefer it on things like English muffins instead of buried in a peanut butter sandwich. I am going to try it in jam filled cookies or thumbprint cookies this fall and see how it holds up – it would make those treats “gourmet”!

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